SIZZLING SUMMER SCRAMBLE

CALL TODAY to REGISTER!

Saturday, July 25th, 2020 1:00pm Lunch | 2:00pm Shotgun Start

Join us for a fun day of golf on the beautiful Meadowview Golf Course!

4 Person Scramble

Flighted based on number of entries

Lots of Prizes

Open to the first 25 teams!

$50 per person

Contact the Pro Shop to Register

Sign up deadline July 23th

Join us in the Meadowview Cafe for after golf specials

217-258-7888

Due to the State of Illinois’s Executive Order,

Meadowview will be closed through April 7th

Meadowview wants to do their part to protect our golfers, employees and community.  Therefore, effective immediately, Meadowview and our sister courses will be closed through April 7th per Illinois’s Executive Order 20-10 (click on link below to read).

We have been actively trying to get clarification from the State of Illinois since the executive order was announced on whether golf courses can remain open.  Finally, this afternoon, we received word this question was addressed by the state, and the answer is; “we must close”.

Please read the last page of the below link on the part that addresses golf courses.

https://www2.illinois.gov/dceo/SmallBizAssistance/Documents/Essential%20Business%20Checklist3-22.pdf#search=essential%20business%20checklist

Unfortunately, we are all dealing with the economic fallout of this global virus.  But ultimately, the safety of everyone is the most important issue. We will continue to maintain the golf course as it is essential to our business; so we can be ready for all of you, our valued golfers and friends, on April 8th!  We will all get through this.  Stay safe everyone!

In the meantime, if you are interested in renewing or purchasing your membership, click on the button below to navigate to Meadowview’s online store.

https://meadowviewgolf.com/online-store/

Is your game lacking some key shots?  Perhaps the simplest solution is to have your clubs re-gripped.  Our knowledgeable staff can help with the decision making and proper grip choice for your game.

GOLF CLUB REGRIPPING

Meadowview offers a range of quality grips.  Ozone, heat, dirt, and oils from your hands all age your grips and cause damage.   Grips that are the wrong size, worn out or that aren’t suited for weather conditions can all negatively impact your game. We recommend having your clubs re-gripped once a year or every 30 – 40 rounds depending on how much time you spend on the practice range.

A good grip can improve comfort, consistency and shot distance. You can personalize your grip type, size, color and material to get one that best suits your hands.

A grip should always be replaced if you notice any of the following signs…

• smooth hard surfaces

• cracks

• shiny patches

• worn spots

• loss of tack

GOLF CLUB RESHAFTING

Broken shafts happen and whether it’s an accident or on purpose we can supply and fit shafts from all the main manufacturers. We can simply perform a straight replacement or perhaps recommend a new improved type of shaft that could lengthen your drivers.

We have a large assortment of grips in stock or one day custom ship.  

Stop in today to check out the selection.

 

We have exciting news to share with you…

We just acquired the Oaks Golf Course located in Springfield, Illinois!  As a loyal customer, you will have another fabulous golf course to play.  We are underway with many renovations to get the course opened and ready for the 2019 golf season.

The 18-hole golf course features over 6000 yards of golf with beautiful terrain and mature trees.  The Oaks opened in 1926 and was one of Springfield’s first premier golf courses.

If you are a current member of one of our sister courses, Lakeshore, Meadowview or Timberlake, you can now play The Oaks with your membership!

Open to the Public

Contact The Oaks at info@theoaksgolfcourse.com

Directions: from I-55 take exit 98A (I-72) East. Take exit 104, turn left, go North 1 3/4 miles. Turn right on Oakcrest Rd. Then course is to the right. Turn right on Dave Stockton Drive and follow it to the clubhouse.

 

We have exciting news to share with you…

We just acquired the Oaks Golf Course located in Springfield, Illinois!  As a loyal customer, you will have another fabulous golf course to play.  We are underway with many renovations to get the course opened and ready for the 2019 golf season.

The 18-hole golf course features over 6000 yards of golf with beautiful terrain and mature trees.  The Oaks opened in 1926 and was one of Springfield’s first premier golf courses.

If you are a current member of one of our sister courses, Lakeshore, Meadowview or Timberlake, you can now play The Oaks with your membership!

Open to the Public

Contact The Oaks at info@theoaksgolfcourse.com

Directions: from I-55 take exit 98A (I-72) East. Take exit 104, turn left, go North 1 3/4 miles. Turn right on Oakcrest Rd. Then course is to the right. Turn right on Dave Stockton Drive and follow it to the clubhouse.

How to Avoid the Most Common Golf Injury

Lower Back Pain Is No Joke, But It’s Preventable

Golf is a unique sport because you can often participate even if you’re not as physically fit as you once were. That said, golf isn’t always an injury-free sport. Low back pain is the golf injury you’re most likely to sustain. Luckily, it can be avoided.

The following tips will help.

Warm Up

Golf may not seem as intense as a sport like football or hockey, but you still need to warm up before playing. Loosening your muscles helps to prevent discomfort. Practice these basic exercises to prep your muscles for a few hours on the course:

  • Hold the club behind your neck, one hand on each end, and rotate your torso to stretch your neck.
  • Pull your knees towards your chest a few times to stretch out your hips.
  • Keep your hamstrings loose by bending down and reaching towards your shoes.

If you’re having trouble with these stretches, or they don’t seem to be effective, getting direct access to physical therapy could help. A few sessions with an expert could help you learn how to properly stretch before golfing to avoid lower back and other injuries.

Practice Your Swing

Golfers apply torque and torsion to their lower backs in order to generate sufficient club speed when swinging. This puts strain on the lower back. That’s why practicing a swing regularly is important. You want to emphasize smooth motions. Additionally, researchers have found that attempting to mimic the “X-factor” swing of professionals (in which you attempt to maximize rotation of your shoulders relative to your hips) may result in injury.

Maintaining proper balance while swinging also helps protect your back. Keep your knees bent and shoulder width-apart, while maintaining a straight spine.

It will take practice to develop a smooth swing, but it’s necessary. Doing so will keep you comfortable while also improving your overall performance while playing.

Get the Right Golf Bag

Lifting heavy items incorrectly or repeatedly can result in low back pain. In other words, your swing isn’t the only part of your game you need to optimize if you want to avoid discomfort. You also need the right golf bag.

Don’t use one you have to set down on the ground every time you’re ready to take a swing. Get a bag that has a stand, so you don’t have to lift it up repeatedly throughout a round.

Don’t Make Assumptions About Age

It’s easy to assume low back pain is something only older golfers need to worry about. However, the X-factor swing described above is often more likely to cause certain injuries in younger players. They tend to have more muscle mass than older generations, which puts significant pressure on their spines during the swinging motion. They may also be more likely to apply excessive force. Even if you’re a younger golfer, you should keep these tips in mind. Doing so will also help avoid injury as you get older.

Again, golf is the type of sport you can play well into old age. You’re more likely to be able to if you avoid low back pain. Remembering these points will help you stay out on the course for years.

SOURCE:  Golftipsmag

Solutions for when you’re between yardages

You probably feel pretty good when you’re at the perfect yardage for the club in your hands. But what about those annoying yardages, like when a full 7-iron is going to be too much, and a full 8-iron might not get there? Or when you’re 45 yards from the green and your full lob wedge flies 60? I’ve seen many golfers struggle in these situations because they swing too hard or decelerate the club to try to control distance, and neither really works. If you want to hit more shots pin-high, give the methods I’ve used on the PGA Tour a try. Let’s start with in-between yardages. Here I’m swinging a 7-iron. I normally hit it 185 yards, so if I have 175 to the pin, I stand slightly closer to the ball and narrow my stance a few inches.

I also grip down an inch or so. When I swing, the only adjustment is to stop my backswing just short of my usual top position. Then I make my normal through-swing. I don’t change my speed coming through the ball. That’s key.

Swing speed also is important when you have less than a full wedge into a green. This is the area of the course where I’ve noticed amateurs struggle the most. Part of the reason is because they don’t have a consistent plan for how to handle these short shots. If you don’t have a strategy, it’s hard to know what to practice. And without practice, you’re going to struggle on the course.

The way I handle these shots is to regulate the length of the backswing depending on the length of the shot—shorter distances mean shorter backswings. But the thing to remember is, just like with in-between yardages on longer shots, you have to swing through the ball at the same pace no matter the distance.

I practice three swing lengths with my sand wedge that are less than full, so I have three distances locked in when I’m on the course. If I stop my backswing when the shaft is around the height of my hips (above), I know the ball will go 35 yards. When my forearms are parallel to the ground, it’s going 60 yards. And when my hands stop at my shoulders, it’s going to go 80 yards. Again, I can’t stress enough that you never want to slow down as you come through. It leads to inconsistent strikes.

“KEEP YOUR SWING SPEED UP ON SHORTER SHOTS.”

For even better results, add this to your range sessions: Hit 10 balls each with your backswing stopping at three different lengths. Make note of how far the ball goes with each, and rely on those swings to produce the right yardages when you get on the course. You’ll be a lot more confident in hitting half-wedge shots pin-high.—with Keely Levins

SOURCE:  Golfdigest

Who Knew??

The original Augusta was intended to have a hole 19, giving losing golfers a chance to win their money back on a quick round of double-or-nothing. It was indefinitely tabled because the hole would ruin the flow of the golf course.

Would you like the option of winning your money back?

 

Keep The Lead Hip Firm For A Solid Swing

For More Power, Avoid Sliding Toward Target
One of the most prevalent issues that I see with my students, is sliding the left, or lead hip (right-handed golfer) too far toward the target in the downswing.

Most of us, when we first started playing the game, were told to hit against a firm left side. When the left hip moves well past the left foot, there isn’t a whole lot of firmness. And, there isn’t a whole lot of rotation. And without rotation, power is dramatically reduced.

Here is an analogy that might help put you back on track:

Maybe you have a fenced-in back yard with a gate. If you don’t, humor me and just pretend that you do. If the post that the gate is attached to is straight up and down, the gate opens and closes perfectly. If the post is tilted, good luck with the gate. Same with your golf swing. At impact, if the left hip is over the left knee and left ankle, forming a straight vertical line, your right hip will rotate perfectly just like the gate. If the left hip slides past the left foot, rotation is diminished along with power and accuracy.

Here is a drill to help you get the hang of it:

Stand in a doorway with the outside of your left foot touching the door jam. Cross your arms across your chest. Make a backswing turn and then a through swing turn. During the latter allow your left hip to move laterally just enough to make contact with the jam. That amount will put you in a vertical left leg position, the perfect place for maximum lead hip rotation. And hip rotation translates to more power, which we all want.

John Marshall is a two-time American Long Drivers Association super senior national champion and five-time RE/MAX World Long Drive finalist

SOURCE:  Golftipmag