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Who Knew??

Golf has actually been played on the moon! It is only 1 of 2 sports to literally have been played out-of-this-world, along with the javelin throw. Back in 1971, Apollo 14 astronaut, Alan Shepard, swung a one-handed shot with a six-iron, which was all his pressure suit would allow.

Tell us the most unusual place you have played golf!

It’s time for you to shoot for the moon!

Expectations are back, which means so is Tiger Woods

LA JOLLA, Calif. — It’s winning time for Tiger Woods again.

A year ago, there was rampant uncertainty for Woods, who was coming off a fourth back surgery and wasn’t sure how many golf tournaments he’d be able to play, let alone finish or even win. Now there are expectations.

A year ago, Woods stood at 656th in the Official World Golf Rankings. When he plays in Thursday’s opening round of the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in his first tournament since September, Woods will walk to the tee ranked 13th in the world having won his last start, the 2018 Tour Championship.

A year ago, baby steps were more than acceptable for Woods, who found himself satisfied with gradual progress and so-so results. Now, winning is all that matters again for Woods — just the way it used to be for the player who has won 80 times in his career and glared at you if you had the gall to ask him before a tournament what his expectations were for that particular week.

Woods no longer carries that arrogant edge he used to, at least not publicly. He’s been humbled both by his physical ailments and thoughts of never being able to compete again. And, by the way, he’s been embraced by the fans during his comeback from a real-life abyss.

But make no mistake: At age 43, and with the window slowly closing, Woods knows he’s got to win now while he’s healthy.

“There is some momentum from last year because there’s a better understanding of what I can do,’’ Woods said Tuesday after playing a 10-hole practice round with Jordan Spieth. “Going into this event last year, I really didn’t know. And the fact that I was able to get through, I didn’t have any zinging down my leg like I did before, I didn’t have any problems at night recovering for the next day, even though I finished 30th or 25th, whatever the hell I finished [23rd], those were big accomplishments for me.

“Now, this year it’s totally different. I know what I can do, I know what I’m feeling. So now it’s about finishing a little bit better and winning some events this year.’’

Woods has competed at Torrey Pines 17 times. He has seven wins and a dozen top-10 finishes. His last win at Torrey Pines came in 2013. His 14th and last major championship victory came at Torrey Pines in the 2008 U.S. Open.

Woods will play the first two rounds with Tony Finau and Xander Schauffele, beginning on the South course Thursday at 1:40 p.m. (Eastern time) and then the North course on Friday at 12:30 p.m.

Four months removed from his stirring win at the Tour Championship in Atlanta, where the fans surrounded him like the pied piper on the 72nd hole, Woods is still energized by the emotions of the moment as much as it being his 80th career victory.

SOURCE:  NYPost.com

10 Pro Tips for Playing the Best Golf of Your Life

IF YOU WANT TO GET A few extra yards and take a few strokes off your golf game, you’re probably tempted to splurge on a fancy new driver or revolutionary new golf ball. But the fact is, you can get even better results from proper preparation. Armed with nothing but a pro warm-up routine and a little know-how, you could add a dozen yards to your drive and take several strokes off your score card. Here’s how.

1. Warm up.

I wish two draft beers and half a cigar was a warm-up, but it is not. Full-body movements that include trunk flexing, extending and rotating are a great start. Other dynamic warm-up moves should target hip rotation in all directions. Lastly, making sure that your shoulders are prepared for all parts of your back swing and follow through will ensure a good first shot from the tee box.

2. Hydrate.

Being only 10 percent dehydrated can lead to a loss of up to 5 percent of your ability to produce power. That means that if you’re used to hitting your 9-iron 130 yards, now you’ve lost 7 yards. You like hitting that 5-iron 180? Not anymore: If you’re dehydrated, you’re now only hitting it 170. Any good golfer knows how important being on your distances can be when trying to beat the course. It’s pretty hard to know how far you will hit your clubs if you are not properly hydrated.

3. Get fueled up.

If you think hydration is important for athletic output, then you’d better understand how vital proper pre-golf nutrition is to your success, too. Golf is a marathon with bouts of some pretty explosive movements. And, it all happens over the course of a lot of walking and strategizing. If you don’t have a good base of calories and blood sugar to start with, it’s like trying to drive from Virginia to Maine on a half tank of gas.

4. Keep fueling.

It’s so easy to get lost in the competition of the game of golf. The excitement of good shots. The frustration of duffs and slices. It’s all any of us can do to keep our heads together. Now, try limiting your brain’s energy source during a round and the mental game gets a lot harder. Something as simple as some trail mix, an energy drink or a peanut butter and jelly sandwich will keep your mind sharp and your muscles purring.

5. Be strong.

This isn’t necessarily something you can do before each round of golf, but it should be in the forefront of your mind if getting better at golf is the goal. Any strength-building activity you enjoy and can do consistently will work. The important thing is knowing that strength is built in the off-season, sped up in the preseason and hopefully maintained in some manner during the season.

6. Be flexible.

You’re not going to see a lot of true flexibility gains from a few stretches before a round of golf. What you will feel is a much more prepared nervous system and improved joint mobility, which will translate to your golf game as more pure and efficient mobility. This is key for anyone trying to beat a course, break a distance mark or just get through a round without nagging aches and pains.

7. Seek coaching.

Lots of folks are good athletes or have played sports their entire lives, but things seem to change when they pick up a golf club; their athletic experience just doesn’t transfer. As a lifelong baseball athlete, I can speak to this frustration firsthand. There are few things more aggravating than having difficulty hitting that little white ball on the ground.

But put me, or any other experienced athlete, back into their familiar setting like holding a baseball bat, tennis racket or a basketball, and things feel right again. Once you get a pro to look at you swing a club and help you refine some of your technique, your game – and outlook – will improve.

8. Know good pain from bad pain.

Knowing the difference between “good” pain that’s part of progress and “bad” pain that leads to injury starts in off-season golf-strengthening programs and continues through life. Those of us who know what “good” pain is also spend less time sitting out practices or rounds of golf because we know how useful movement is for healing and furthering our own athletic progress.

9. Periodize.

This term might not be familiar to even serious golfers, but to a strength coach or a physical therapist, this is one of the most important pieces of the golf strength, injury prevention and performance puzzle. This is the term we use to describe how training programs change depending on a golfer’s current fitness level and the time of the year we’re working.

For example, how important is it for a golfer who lives in the mid-Atlantic or northeast to be the most explosive and most ready to play golf in December? Not very. So, seek golf-specific programming for all of the different phases of the year, as well as competition and play. In this way, you can get the most out of each phase and maximize your physical abilities during the golf season.

10. Rest and recover.

This shouldn’t be the first time any good golfer has heard that taking proper care of your body after some time at the range or after a round of golf is a good idea. This might, however, be the first time that you realize that it could be the single most important – and easiest – thing you can do to ensure a pain-free and rewarding golf season.

SOURCE:  USNews&WorldReport

Stay fit for better golf in 2019!

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Who Knew??

The first ever golf balls were made of thin leather, stuffed with goose feathers. ‘Feather balls’ were used up until 1848, when they were replaced with the ‘Guttie’ ball, named for the rubber-like sap of the Gutta tree, found in the tropics.

What is your favorite golf ball to play with?

Come on out a tee it up!

MAKE THE ONES YOU HATE TO MISS

A six-footer is by no means a gimme, but it’s still short enough that it stings when it doesn’t go in. To make more of these, start by locking in your speed. It’s the most important part of every putt. And when you assess speed, don’t just factor how fast the ball needs to roll to get to the front of the cup. Think about it: You’re not trying to be so precise with your putting that the ball falls in on its last rotation. So forget the front of the cup. You should be looking at a spot 1½ feet beyond the hole. You’ll still be in tap-in range if you miss, but now you know the ball is going to get there every time.

Once you’ve determined that spot, then you can read the break. Start by walking to the hole, and try to picture the line in your head, keeping in mind that it continues 18 inches past the cup. Typically a putt of this length isn’t going to break that much—unless your course is Augusta National.

To get my speed down, I often practice with a small silicone cover over the top of the hole. The ball rolls right over it. If you don’t have one, you can just putt over the location of an old cup like I’m doing here (see bottom photo). The point is to get the ball to stop at a consistent distance beyond the hole. After I hit a putt that rolls over the cup and stops where I want it to stop, I’ll put a dime down to mark that end point. Then I’ll stroke putts over the hole trying to get every one to stop on a dime, so to speak.

DEVELOP A SHOT CLOCK
Having a pre-shot routine is important, but that doesn’t mean only doing the same things before every putt. Just as important is the amount of time you take to do those things. It will make a big difference if there’s a consistent duration from setup to stroke—it gives you good rhythm and confidence. Another thing you should do before you hit a putt is to take one last look at your line of putt all the way to the hole and then back to your ball—but do it quickly. The longer you stand over the ball, the more likely you’ll start to psych yourself out that you might miss. Good putting is a lot more mental than physical. Not a lot can go wrong with your stroke on a six-footer—it’s a fairly short and quiet motion. If you can relax and trust in what you’ve done prior to the putt, your chance of rolling one in will go way up.

BE AN ATHLETE, NOT A ROBOT
If you struggle with these makable putts, it’s probably because you’re too focused on using perfect mechanics. I’ve got news for you, guys like me on the PGA Tour rarely set up and make a textbook stroke, yet the tour average for putts made from six feet last season was 70 percent. What I’m saying is, there are a lot of ways to get the ball to go in the hole.

Putting is extremely personal, but everyone should feel comfortable over the ball. I like when my arms hang freely, and I have a slight roundness to my back. As for the stroke, I don’t think about the length the putter moves back and through. Instead, I try to be as athletic as possible, meaning my process is to look at what I have to do—then react. If you’re shooting a basketball, you don’t think about how hard your arm has to move for the ball to reach the basket, you just look at the rim and let it fly. Try putting with that same mind-set.

SOURCE:  golfdigest

 

Who Knew??

The chances of making two holes-in-one in a round of golf are one in 67 million.

How many hole-in-one’s have you had???  Tell us when & where!

Why not try for yourself?  Book a tee time today!

Get The Correct Golf Grip

It’s Key To Proper Takeaway and Swing Plane

Few aspects of the golf swing hold more fascination for struggling club golfers than how to achieve the correct golf grip.

Swing plane, pronation, supination, re-routing, downswing transition, leg drive, and hip resistance on the backswing are some of the more elaborate theories investigated by golfers who habitually slice or hook. Yet more often than not the real cause of wayward shots lies in the way a golfer places his hands on the club. So, before you start making extreme changes to swing mechanics, you should first simplify the golf swing technique by making sure the grip is correct. Following are three of the most important aspects of the grip that affect the takeaway, swing path, plane, and control.

Correct Golf Grip Golden Rules and Tips

The ‘V’s created by the index finger and the thumb of the left and right hands must point to the right shoulder.

Although this is extremely well known, it’s surprising how many golfers have trouble achieving this orthodox hand position. A golfer who slices normally has a weak grip where the left hand is too much underneath the shaft. If you slice, the first thing you should check is that the left hand is turned more to the right, with three knuckles visible after taking up the stance.

Conversely, a golfer who hooks should check that the left hand is not in a “strong” position where it is turned to the right too much.

How the Grip Affects Golf Swing Plane Mechanics

The path of the golf swing takeaway is directly affected by the grip. If the left hand is twisted round to the right too much in a ‘strong’ grip, it generally sets the left arm higher than the right – this leads to a swing path that is too inside and a swing plane that is too flat, which results in a hook. If the golfer’s left hand is on the club in a “weak” position, the right arm is set higher than the left at the address which leads to an outside swing path, a steep swing plane and invariably a slice. Although you may know that you swing the club too flat or upright, before you try to swing onto a more effective plane, check that the hands are placed on the club in a neutral grip.

The Grip Right Thumb and Index Finger Position

Topping the ball is a very common fault. In many cases it can be cured with the correct placement of the right thumb and index finger on the club of the right hand. As the club comes into impact the index finger of the right hand is responsible for accurately squaring up the blade and must be in the most efficient position to guide the club. The thumb is responsible for driving the clubhead down into the ball. It is vital for the thumb to be set on the left-hand side of the shaft — not on top of the shaft, which may seem logical but is wrong.

Backswing Control and the Long Left Thumb

One of the most common causes of mis-hit shots is the loss of control at the top of the backswing. An overswing means a loss of control but with good placement of the left-hand thumb on the club, unless double jointed, an overswing becomes almost impossible.

When taking up the grip, allow the left thumb to sit naturally on the club and not stuck down the shaft, which creates an ugly gap between the thumb and index finger. With the thumb in this position, it is much more capable of controlling the downswing transition, when leverage is at its maximum.

SOURCE: golftipsmag.com

 

Who knew??

Augusta National Golf Club, which is one of the most famous courses in the world, closed for three years at the height of World War II. Golf was replaced by cattle and turkey on its grounds to help support the war effort.

The grass was literally greener!

The countdown is on for THE MASTERS — Who do you think will win the green jacket?

Time to tee it up!

Only 99 days!

The 2019 Masters Tournament will be the 83rd edition of the Masters Tournament and the first of golf’s four major championships to be held in 2019. It will be held from April 11–14 at Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia.

Who will you be cheering for to WIN the 2019 Masters?

GIVE US YOUR PREDICTIONS…

13th Green

Play like a Champion Today!

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